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Wide Bandwidth Wireless – “Bluetooth on Steroids”
Part I – Background and Basics of UWB
Part II – UWB Receiver Designs for Multiple Access Interference Environments in Multipath

February 17, 2011
6:00 pmto8:30 pm

The IEEE Canadian Atlantic Section Signal Processing and Microwave Theory and Techniques Chapter and the Dalhousie University Faculty of Engineering invite you to the following 2-hour seminar which is open to public and the details are as follows:

Title: Wide Bandwidth Wireless – “Bluetooth on Steroids”
Part I – Background and Basics of UWB
Part II – UWB Receiver Designs for Multiple Access Interference Environments in Multipath
Speaker: Dr. Norman C. Beaulieu, Canada Research Chair (Tier I) in Broadband Wireless Communications, Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Canada
Time: 6:00pm-8:30pm, Thursday, February 17, 2011
Place: Room B311, Sexton Campus, Dalhousie University, 1360 Barrington Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
Refreshments: Refreshments will be provided to the attendees
Local Contacts: Dr. Zhizhang (David) Chen at z <dot> chen <at> dal <dot> ca, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Dalhousie University, Tel: (902) 494-6042

Abstract:

Part I: Background and Basics of UWB

Ultra-wide bandwidth (UWB) wireless is envisioned as a license-free replacement for cables and wires, able to transmit at extremely high data rates over short distances and has been dubbed “Bluetooth on steroids”. The principles and structures of time-hopping (TH) ultra-wide bandwidth (UWB) wireless systems are reviewed and the suitability of the conventional matched filter (correlator) digital receiver for TH-UWB applications is discussed. UWB systems situated in the same coverage area will experience multiple-access interference (MAI), and the mitigation of MAI is an important receiver design problem. Insights into the performance of the matched filter TH-UWB receiver are gained from study of examples of the simulated probability density function of the TH-UWB multiple access interference. The MAI in a TH-UWB system is known to be non-Gaussian even when the system has a large number of active users. Therefore, the conventional matched filter (CMF) receiver, the optimal structure for Gaussian noise which maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and minimizes the probability of detection error in the absence of non-Gaussian interference, is not optimal for TH-UWB systems. The unique characteristics of interference in time-hopping UWB systems are explained with a view to proposing some new TH-UWB receiver designs based on examining the characteristics of the simulated multi-user interference density functions. Several statistical models for time-hopped UWB MAI are presented, motivating novel receiver designs which realize superior performance in environments where MAI is significant.

Part II: UWB Receiver Designs for Multiple Access Interference Environments in Multipath

The unique characteristics of interference in time-hopping UWB systems are explained and some new TH-UWB receiver designs are proposed based on examining the characteristics of the simulated multi-user interference density functions. Several statistical models for time-hopped UWB MUI are considered, motivating novel receiver designs which realize superior performance in environments where MAI is significant. Soft-limiting and zonal receiver structures are intuitively motivated and shown to outperform the conventional matched filter UWB receiver by many dB’s in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A generalized Gaussian metric receiver is also proposed and its superior performance established. The improved receiver performances are explained using maximum likelihood (ML) receiver design principles. The application of the new signal detection structures in modified Rake receiver designs for multipath fading UWB channels is examined. Several of these receivers have adaptive implementations that effectively cope with MAI, multipath fading and additive white Gaussian noise, providing significantly lower error-rate floors in comparison to the conventional linear receiver. The performance of a theoretically optimal TH-UWB receiver is established and used to benchmark the nonlinear receiver designs.

About the Speaker:

Norm Beaulieu received the B.A.Sc. degree, the M.A.Sc. degree and the Ph.D. degree, all in electrical engineering from the University of British Columbia in Canada. He also studied at McGill University and the Technical University of Denmark. Professor Beaulieu was appointed Queen’s National Scholar Assistant Professor at Queen’s University, and subsequently Associate Professor and Full Professor at Queen’s. Dr. Beaulieu then held two research chairs at the University of Alberta, the iCORE Research Chair in Broadband Wireless Communications and the Canada Research Chair in Broadband Wireless Communications. Dr. Beaulieu is the recipient of the J Gordin Kaplan Award for Excellence in Research of the University of Alberta, the Royal Society of Canada Thomas W. Eadie Medal, “in recognition of major contributions to Engineering or Applied Science”, and the Engineering Institute of Canada Médaille K.Y. Lo Medal, “for significant engineering contributions at the international level”. Professor Beaulieu served as the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Communications, in the period January 2000 to December 2003. He is a Fellow of The Royal Society of Canada, an NSERC E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fellow, a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), a Fellow of the Engineering Institute of Canada (EIC), and a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering. In the years 2007/2008, Dr. Beaulieu served as IEEE Communications Society Distinguished Lecturer. In November 2007, he was the recipient of the IEEE Communications Society Edwin Howard Armstrong Achievement Award for outstanding contributions to telecommunications over a period of years. Dr. Beaulieu is the recipient of the 2010 IEEE Canada Reginald Aubrey Fessenden Medal and the 2010 Canadian Award in Telecommunications Research.

 
 
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